Skip to main content
Quick Links
We put students first, seek growth, are open to change, do great work together and value differences.
2512 George Mason Drive • P.O. Box 6038 Virginia Beach, Virginia 23456-0038   757.263.1000 • 757.263.1240 TDD

APA-Accredited Doctoral Internship in Professional Psychology
Psychological Services
Virginia Beach City Public Schools

Psychological Services in the Virginia Beach City Public Schools offers a doctoral psychology internship program in professional psychology for eligible doctoral candidates in school psychology and child clinical psychology. For the 2017-2018 school year, we will have five intern positions available. The internship is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA, Commission on Accreditation, 750 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002-4242; Phone: 202.336.5979 ) and is a member of the Association of Predoctoral and Postdoctoral Internship Centers (APPIC).

The internship runs from July 1 through June 30 for a full calendar year with a stipend of $23,660. Health benefits are provided. Applicants should submit an AAPI Online application for consideration by December 1. No additional or supplemental materials are required. All applicants will be emailed about their interview status by December 15. Selected applicants will be invited for a required on-site interview in January. Interview dates for 2017: January 4, 6, 9, 13. Notification for APPIC Phase I occurs on Friday, February 17, 2017 according to APPIC procedures.

Psychological Services
Goals of the Program
Weekly Seminars
Core Training Experiences
Elementary & Secondary School Assignments
Preschool Assessment Center (PAC)
Supplemental Training Experiences
Alternative Education/Renaissance Academy
Autism Assessment and Consultation Team
Gifted Education Program
SECEP Re-ED
STEP
Supervision of Practicum Students


Supervision
Internship Training Goals and Objectives
What is a typical weekly schedule?
Application, Interview, & Employment Process
Program Faculty
Current and Previous Doctoral Interns
Further Questions

Psychological Services

Psychological Services, a part of the Office of Student Support Services (OSSS), is housed in the Laskin Road Annex (an elementary school building converted to administrative offices), which additionally houses Special Education Services, School Social Work Services, and Audiological Services. There are currently thirty-eight psychologists and six doctoral interns who serve the 87 schools and approximately 67,927 students in Virginia Beach City Public Schools (VBCPS). The district has a diverse ethnic student population comprised of approximately 24% African American, 50% Caucasian, 11% Hispanic/Latino, 9% Multi-racial, 5% Asian and 1% other. Psychologists are licensed by the Virginia Board of Education and/or the Virginia Board of Psychology as school psychologists or clinical psychologists and provide a full range of comprehensive psychological services. These include assessment, consultation, counseling and therapy, and crisis intervention.

[TOP]

Goals of the Program

Five doctoral intern positions are available within a general track. The major goal of our training program is to assist the doctoral intern to become an independent professional psychologist who can provide a variety of psychological services to help improve the mental health and educational outcomes of children, adolescents, and adults within and outside school settings. To achieve this goal, we provide doctoral interns with supervised experiences, educational didactic seminars, and reading assignments to help further develop clinical skills, leadership, and professional self-management.

There are seven primary goals with related training objectives:

  1. Legal/Ethical Professional Practice: Apply legal and ethical standards in professional practice;
  2. Assessment and Report Writing: Develop and refine skills in selection and use of assessment measures, interpretation and integration of assessment data and report writing, and development of appropriate recommendations and interventions;
  3. Counseling/Therapy: Develop and refine individual and group counseling skills;
  4. Consultation: Develop and refine consultation skills and planning, and implementing intervention strategies;
  5. Diagnostic Skills: Refine, develop, and/or acquire new skills in differential diagnosis of disabling conditions and mental disorders;
  6. Cultural and Individual Differences and Diversity: Acquire increased knowledge and skills in working with clients from a variety of cultural and ethnic backgrounds and exceptionalities; and
  7. Research: Develop and refine skills in understanding and applying research data and research studies to the daily practice of psychology.

To accomplish these goals within a practitioner-scientist training model and a developmental model of supervision, doctoral interns are exposed to an increasingly complex set of duties. Beginning in the summer with an orientation to the doctoral internship program and the department's services to the school district, doctoral interns participate in additional didactic activities including professional reading on relevant topics and best practices, discussing ethical and legal issues, and reviewing local, state, and federal regulations for special education. Doctoral interns then participate in vicarious learning through observations of psychoeducational assessments, counseling sessions, Student Response Teams, and Special Education eligibility meetings related to the educational placement of and behavioral interventions for students with various learning and emotional disabilities. At the next level, doctoral interns either deliver services on their own with the direct supervision of staff psychologists or co-lead professional activities with assigned supervisors. The supervisors observe the doctoral interns administering tests, consulting with teachers and parents, and counseling groups and individuals. When the supervisor is assured of the competency of the doctoral intern's skills, the supervision becomes more indirect through consultation and ongoing discussions of the doctoral intern's concerns.

[TOP]

Weekly Seminars

Since the doctoral internship is viewed as a learning experience, there is a balance between training and service delivery throughout the year. As part of the training program, Psychological Services staff as well as professionals in the community provide weekly 2-hour didactic presentations designed to further enhance professional growth and practical skills of doctoral interns. While specific didactic curriculum varies yearly based on the needs of doctoral interns, didactics typically cover a variety of treatment topics (such as clinical interviewing, managing suicidal students, sexual abuse treatment), regulations and procedures (such as Special Education process, Student Response Teams, manifestation hearings), and professional development and licensure (report writing, ethical issues in practice, and path to licensure).

Specifically, all doctoral interns participate in a monthly child treatment seminar series. These didactics focus on specific treatment techniques that address a variety of mental health issues. The doctoral interns will have an opportunity to review some of the latest clinical literature, learn through case examples, and utilize various therapeutic resources. As the year progresses, these didactics will also give the doctoral interns the opportunity to present their individual therapy cases (via video/audio) and focus on specific techniques and interventions for those individual cases.

Doctoral interns are also assigned periodic readings on professional issues and engage in discussions on such topics during didactics as well as in group and individual supervision. These topical discussions are integrated with their assigned cases and professional work. Doctoral interns are given opportunities to attend local, state, and national conferences and workshops.

[TOP]

Core Training Experiences

During the doctoral internship program, doctoral interns provide a variety of direct and indirect services. The doctoral internship provides opportunities to develop new skills while also refining skills acquired through graduate training. Throughout the doctoral internship program, doctoral interns acquire proficiency and competency levels in the areas of consultation with teachers, parents and administrators, psychological and psychoeducational assessment, individual and group counseling, behavioral interventions, program planning and evaluation, crisis management, conducting in-services, parent training, working with community agencies and other professionals, and conducting research that contributes to the school systems' needs and goals.

Doctoral interns are subsequently assigned one elementary school and one secondary school (middle or high school) for which they provide the full-continuum of psychological services. All doctoral interns are also assigned a half-year rotation in the citywide Preschool Assessment Center. Doctoral interns are given additional assignments based on the doctoral intern's specific interests, the doctoral internship's training goals, and the needs of the school district. These various assignments are described in more detail below.

[TOP]

Elementary & Secondary School Assignments

Doctoral interns are assigned an elementary school and a secondary school (middle or high school). At the assigned elementary and secondary schools, doctoral interns provide comprehensive psychological services to both general education and special education students under supervision of their primary supervisors. Doctoral interns serve on the school's Student Response Team, which assists in developing educational and behavioral interventions for students within the general education program. Consultation in the general education program may involve observation, evaluation of the instructional environment, classroom management, recommending effective teaching strategies, and referring students for further intervention with the 504 team or the special education committee. Doctoral interns observe these team meetings at the beginning of the year and throughout the year, and discuss with their primary supervisor appropriate recommendations and when to refer for further intervention.

Doctoral interns also serve on the school's special education committee that refers students for comprehensive evaluations, reviews assessment results, and determines appropriate special education placement and educational recommendations. Doctoral interns complete the psychological portion of the comprehensive assessment, which may include IQ testing, achievement testing, behavioral assessment, personality assessment, observation, and other case-specific assessment. Under supervision, doctoral interns select and administer tests and interpret and write formal psychological reports which review test results. Doctoral interns, as members of the special education committee, might be asked to serve on manifestation determination hearings.

Doctoral interns may also participate in the development of individual education plans, especially if counseling or therapy is provided as a related service. Doctoral interns provide counseling and therapy for students experiencing emotional adjustment problems or more severe emotional disorders that are impacting educational and personal/social functioning. Therapy cases are discussed on a weekly basis both with the doctoral intern’s primary supervisor and in group supervision. Doctoral interns also provide crisis counseling and crisis intervention, assessments for risk of suicide and violence, consultation with parents, teachers and staff, and staff in-services. In addition, parent training opportunities may also be provided.

Typically, the assigned schools have a full range of special education classes (inclusion, resource, self-contained) that serve students with specific learning disabilities, emotional disabilities, speech and language impairments or intellectual disabilities. The assigned schools may also have programs for students with other disabilities such as hearing or visual impairment, orthopedic impairment, traumatic brain injury, communication disorders or developmental delays.

[TOP]

Preschool Assessment Center (PAC)

In addition to elementary and secondary school assignments, all doctoral interns are also assigned to the Preschool Assessment Center (PAC) which provides screening, testing, and program planning for children in the community between two and five years of age who are suspected of having speech/language delays, developmental delays, and/or developmental disorders. The PAC has four psychologists that conduct assessments, program planning, and consult with at-risk students and their families. The preschool psychologist is responsible for evaluation in the areas of cognitive development, early academic development, and social-emotional development. Assessment measures include The Bayley Scales of Infant Development-Third Edition, the Differential Ability Scales-Second Edition and other developmentally appropriate measures. In addition, standardized information may be obtained from the parent or guardian in the form of a behavior rating checklist to assess behavioral and/or social-emotional challenges. Observations in community based preschool/daycare settings may also be included in the evaluation.

All doctoral interns are responsible for an average of two assessments per week in the PAC during their six month rotation. The assessments are conducted in an arena format, with a psychologist, speech/language pathologist, and an early childhood special education teacher working together to assess the child. The PAC also conducts assessments using a diagnostic classroom model located at Corporate Landing Elementary. In this model, preschoolers are observed and assessed as they participate in activities and perform tasks through a typical preschool routine over a 3 to 4 week period. Doctoral interns begin their summer by observing several preschool assessments. They are also presented with an introduction to the assessment instruments and practice administration. Using a developmental model, doctoral interns are brought into the assessment process and observed by the preschool psychologists who provide supervision on test administration, interpretation, and report writing. Doctoral interns also present their results at regularly scheduled eligibility meetings.

[TOP]

Supplemental Training Experiences

Doctoral interns also receive additional training from completing a supplemental training rotation where they receive a variety of specialized experiences. Doctoral interns are encouraged to discuss the clinical experiences they wish to have during doctoral internship with their primary supervisors. Supplemental rotations are decided based upon each doctoral intern’s own interests and training goals as well as the needs of the school system. The supplemental training experiences (rotations) are described below.

[TOP]

Alternative Education/Renaissance Academy

Renaissance Academy is a state-of-the-art facility that houses all of our alternative education programs at the middle and high school levels. This experience allows the doctoral interns to work with crisis situations that require the development of skills with threat and risk analysis to a greater degree than in other settings. Interventions are developed with an understanding of legal responsibilities along with clinical appropriateness. Doctoral interns also conduct individual counseling and therapy and co-lead various groups focused on topics such as life skills, stress management, loss issues, peer issues, and anger management. In addition, doctoral interns gain experience working with parents in developing cooperative intervention plans between the home and the school. Other agencies, such as the courts or private therapeutic organizations, may also be involved in these plans. This allows doctoral interns opportunities to coordinate services among the providing agencies. Doctoral interns consult with school staff and assist in developing interventions to address cognitive, behavioral, and emotional issues. There are opportunities to conduct functional behavioral assessments and develop behavioral intervention plans as well as provide routine psychological assessments, and participate in special education and manifestation determination meetings.

[TOP]

Autism Assessment and Consultation Team

The Autism Assessment and Consultation Team is available to consult with Psychological Services staff on cases throughout the district involving Autism. The focus of this team is on assessment and helping staff members with differential diagnosis when the presence of an Autism Spectrum Disorder is unclear. Assessment techniques utilized may include direct observation utilizing various methods: the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule 2nd Edition (ADOS-2), parent interview through use of the Checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorders (CASD) and other methods, and interpretation of a variety of rating scales (including the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ), Social Responsiveness Scale, 2nd Edition (SRS-2), and other measures. The ADOS-2 is administered by the team for those cases where it is deemed a necessary component of the comprehensive psychological evaluation. The team is comprised of staff trained through WPS and New York University to administer the ADOS-2 and to train others at the site. The staff also serves on the eligibility team for the Southeastern Cooperative Education Programs Autism Spectrum Program (SECEP ASP), a special education placement for students with ASD who need a more restrictive placement. Further opportunities for assessment of a variety of students on the Autism spectrum occur through this role as well. Doctoral interns will have opportunities to learn and administer a variety of assessment instruments specific to Autism and to serve on the SECEP ASP eligibility team during a six month rotation.

[TOP]

Gifted Education Program

Doctoral interns may have the opportunity to work with students in the gifted education program. Virginia Beach City Public Schools operates one gifted magnet school, Brickell Academy at Old Donation School, which serves students in grades 2-8. The district also provides gifted and talented resource classes at the elementary and secondary levels. All doctoral interns have the opportunity to complete a limited number of assessment cases to assist in eligibility decisions.

Doctoral interns with further interests in this area can elect to have gifted education as a supplemental assignment during the year. Those doctoral interns will have the opportunity to conduct individual assessments and attend Student Response Team and special education committee meetings at the magnet school. They will provide teacher/staff consultation on issues related to assessment, gifted and special education identification, instructional strategies, classroom management, mental health issues, as well as other areas. Doctoral interns would also provide individual and group counseling/therapy for students related to special education, anger management, adjustment, depression, and other identified concerns. Opportunities are available for parent consultation, parent training, family therapy, and crisis intervention.

[TOP]

SECEP Re-ED

The Southeastern Cooperative Education Programs (SECEP) offers a Re-Education of Children Program (Re-ED), which is an alternative program for students who are identified as having an emotional disability and who have been unable to maintain appropriate behavioral control in previous placements. Typical student diagnoses include Mood Disorders, Attachment Disorders, Anxiety Disorders, ADHD, and ODD with a clinical presentation including significant behavioral and emotional difficulties. Doctoral interns work with the psychologist assigned to the elementary SECEP Re-ED program in which they provide weekly individual therapy or co-lead groups focused on topics such as anger management or peer relationships/social skills. Doctoral interns may also gain experience collaborating with parents and working with classroom teachers to develop individual behavior plans.

[TOP]

STEP

Doctoral interns may be assigned to the Supportive Therapeutic Educational Program (STEP), which is located in various elementary, middle, and high schools. STEP is designed to provide individualized academic instruction and intensive therapeutic services to students with emotional disabilities. The goals of the program are to: (1) increase the student’s learning in a supportive therapeutic environment, (2) improve the student’s behavior and psychological well-being so that the student can return to a less restrictive environment, (3) prevent unnecessary hospitalization or residential treatment, and (4) assist the student’s family by providing case management services. Treatment teams include a special education teacher, teacher assistant, and psychologist. Doctoral interns will assist the psychologist in providing emotional and therapeutic support; addressing appropriate behavioral, social, and emotional goals; and assisting students to develop independence and self-management. Responsibilities may include providing group and individual therapy, and consulting with teachers and parents on a regular basis. Doctoral interns may also assist with gathering information and conducting clinical interviews with students and parents who have been referred for placement consideration in STEP, and attending IEP meetings for students who have been referred or who are already in the program.

[TOP]

Supervision of Practicum Students

There are opportunities for doctoral interns interested in supervision to supervise first and second year graduate students from a local APA-approved clinical psychology program. Psychological Services provides a site for practicum experiences in intellectual assessment, personality assessment, and psychotherapy.

[TOP]

Supervision

Primary Supervision
There are multiple types of supervision offered to each doctoral intern throughout the doctoral internship year. Each doctoral intern is assigned a primary supervisor who is a doctoral level psychologist from either a clinical psychology or school psychology program who is licensed for independent practice as a clinical psychologist through the Virginia Board of Psychology. The doctoral intern meets with his or her primary supervisor for at least 2 hours of weekly individual supervision. These supervisory sessions will focus on all the psychological services the doctoral intern will be providing to their assigned schools including testing, interventions/therapy, consultation, and any professional or standards-of-care issues that might arise. In addition, the primary supervisor assists in coordinating/monitoring all clinical activities conducted at other sites where the doctoral intern is assigned (Alternative Education, Gifted Education). The assignment of primary supervisor-to-doctoral intern is made within the first two weeks after meetings with all supervisors and doctoral interns; during this time the interests and skill-sets of the doctoral interns are discussed and matched to the areas of interest/experience of the different supervisors.

Group Supervision
Weekly two-hour group supervision sessions are held for doctoral interns and other interested staff. Each primary supervisor will serve as facilitator for the group supervision meetings on a rotating basis, but all supervisors may attend these group sessions. This provides an opportunity for all primary supervisors to work with all the doctoral interns, and provides doctoral interns with different perspectives on assessment and therapy issues. Any staff member is invited to bring any testing or therapy case to these meetings for input and feedback. The doctoral intern of the facilitating primary supervisor is expected to be prepared to discuss a case, but all doctoral interns are encouraged to discuss any cases of interest. During these sessions issues related to particular cases, professional practice, ethics, etc. are discussed. Videotapes and audiotapes of therapy sessions, if available, may be reviewed and discussed. Suggestions and recommendations are offered by both doctoral interns and supervisors. Theoretical orientation issues and corresponding interventions, current supportive research and alternative approaches are discussed and debated.

Site Supervision
Doctoral interns also receive individual and/or group supervision on issues related to assessment, consultation, intervention planning, or therapy at their assigned sites (such as Preschool Assessment Center, Alternative Education/Renaissance Academy, Autism Assessment and Consultation Team, etc.) from Site Supervisors who are licensed through the Virginia Board of Psychology as either doctoral level psychologists licensed for independent practice as Clinical Psychologists or non-doctoral level psychologists licensed as School Psychologists – Limited which only allows professional psychological practice within schools.

All primary supervisors meet as a group at least once a month to discuss the doctoral interns' progress, discuss any concerns, determine if any adjustments in schedule or types of experiences need to be made, and share what experiences are being provided and how supervision is provided. Usually, each primary supervisor completes formal evaluations at the end of each semester (or more frequently, if problems are noted and corrective action is needed) and submitted to the Director of the Doctoral Internship Program and to the doctoral intern's university supervisor.

The specific goals and objectives, suggested activities and level of supervision provided are presented in the following table. Interns are expected to reach an overall competence level in the major areas of professional practice (ethical practice, assessment and report writing, counseling/therapy, consultation, diagnostic skills, appreciation of diversity, application of research) by the end of the internship program. It is assumed that all interns will continue to be supervised during their post-doctoral year following internship training.

[TOP]

Internship Training Goals and Objectives


OBJECTIVES

SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES

SUPERVISION LEVEL

Legal / Ethical Professional Practice

1. Apply legal and ethical standards in professional practice.

1. Review national, state and local legal requirements and APA and NASP ethical standards.

1. Discussion, observation, review of intern's work.

2. Follow local procedures for psychologists.

2. Review policies and procedures for office and state special education procedures.

2. Discussion, observation, and review of intern's work.

3. Follow procedures for referrals.

3. Review procedures for referrals. Discuss referrals with appropriate personnel and assist in decision-making process.

3. Discussion, observation, and review of intern's work.

Assessment and Report Writing

4. Refine skills in selecting appropriate assessment measures based on referral questions.

4. Discuss choice of assessment with supervisor(s) and/or choose techniques that cover all the domains in question.

4. Discussion, collaboration with intern and review of reports.

5. Refine, develop, or acquire experience with a variety of cognitive, neuropsychological, academic and personality/behavioral measures.

5. Conduct psychological and psychoeducational assessment to include intellectual, academic, behavioral/personality measures as appropriate with varied age ranges and special education populations. Receive training in new assessment procedures.

5. Provide direct training for new assessment procedures, observe administration of new measures, screen referrals, case consultation, and review reports.

6. Refine, develop, or acquire experience with curriculum-based measures.

6. Review articles and receive training on CBM methods and conduct assessments.

6. Same as above.

7. Refine skills in interpretation and integration of assessment data.

7., 8. Write comprehensive psychological reports with specific recommendations.

7. Case consultation and review reports.

8. Refine skills in developing appropriate and useful recommendations based on assessment data.

8. Same as above.

8. Same as above.

Counseling /Therapy

9. Refine skills in counseling/therapy.

9. Review plans and implementation for counseling programs in progress. Develop plans for and implement individual and group counseling for students with and without disabilities at elementary, middle and high school levels, evaluate effectiveness of session and keep progress notes. Maintain an up-to-date file of counseling research and best practices.

9. Observe intern, co-lead counseling groups. Review session plans and progress notes with intern. Case consultation. Review audiotapes or videotapes, if available, with intern.

Consultation

10. Demonstrate the ability to provide consultation and collaboration with parents, school, and outside personnel regarding mental health, behavioral and educational concerns.

10. Develop plans and implement consultation for teachers, other school personnel and parents, evaluate effectiveness. Maintain an up-to-date file of research and best practices.

10. Discussion with or observation of the intern, and/or review of consultation plans and degree of effectiveness. Discussion with consultee about intern's intervention.

11. Refine skills in planning and implementing intervention strategies, including hypothesis formation.

11. Develop plans and implement intervention strategies, evaluate success and keep records of progress. Maintain up-to-date file of intervention research and best practices.

11. Review of plans, case consultation and/or observation.

Diagnostic Skills

12. Refine, develop, and/or acquire skills in diagnosis of disabling conditions and/or mental disorders.

12. Review special education classifications in federal and state regulations. Review local criteria for identification. Review diagnostic categories of mental disorders, with emphasis on childhood disorders.

12. Case consultation with intern, review of reports and intervention plans.

Cultural and Individual Differences and Diversity:

13. Acquire increased knowledge and skills in working with clients from a variety of cultural backgrounds, exceptionalities and other relevant factors.

13. Observe, participate in, and provide psychological services for clients from a variety of cultural backgrounds and/or exceptionalities. Review current research and materials about culturally diverse populations and specialized needs and concerns in the provision of psychological services. Maintain file of best practices.

13. Monitor and adjust intern's work to provide exposure and experience with a diverse population, consult with interns and other staff regarding diversity issues.

Research

14. Develop and refine skills in understanding and applying research data and research studies to the practice of psychology.

14. Participate in ongoing research studies. Attend research colloquia. Work on dissertation.

14. Arrange research opportunities, schedule research colloquia with William and Mary faculty and Center for Pediatric Research, discuss application of research to daily practice.

[TOP]

What is a typical weekly schedule?

During the summer, schedules of doctoral interns are very flexible. Considerable time is spent in orientation and in structured learning activities (e.g., familiarization with assessment instruments, reviewing federal and state regulations) and conducting student assessments. When the school year begins in September, a routine weekly schedule is set for doctoral interns. Typically one assigned site is allocated for a single day. Doctoral interns work regular staff hours from 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM Monday through Friday with a half-hour for lunch and maintain the same holiday schedule as other 12-month staff members.

A typical weekly schedule may look like this:

Monday:

8:00 AM to 12:00 PM: Preschool Assessment Center (special education eligibility meetings and service delivery, supervision with site supervisor); 12:00 PM to 4:30 PM: Supplemental Rotation Site (service delivery and supervision with site supervisor)

Tuesday:

8:00 AM to 3:00 PM: Elementary School Assignment (service delivery and special education eligibility meetings); 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM: Office (assessment scoring, report writing, program planning)

Wednesday:

8:00 AM to 2:30 PM: Secondary School Assignment (service delivery and special education eligibility meetings); 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM: Office (assessment scoring, report writing, program planning)

Thursday:

8:00 AM to 2:30 PM: Elementary or Secondary School Assignment, as needed (service delivery such as intervention, therapy, assessment); 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM: Individual Supervision with Primary Supervisor

Friday:

8:00 AM to 10:00 AM: Office (paperwork); 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM: Training Seminar; 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM: Group Supervision; 3:00PM - 4:30 PM Office

The directors of training, primary supervisors, and interns collaborate in establishing a schedule that addresses the interns' educational needs, the assignments and experiences chosen to meet those needs and the unique characteristics of the sites assigned. Adaptability, flexibility and time management issues are discussed and addressed when individual schedules are established and regularly monitored by the supervisors.

[TOP]

Application, Interview, & Employment Process

Applicants should submit an AAPI Online application for consideration by December 1. No additional or supplemental materials are required. If you are a first-time user to AAPI, you must create a new account. The selection committee reviews all applications and selects applicants for interview. All applicants will be emailed about their interview status by December 15. Selected applicants will be invited for a required on-site interview in January. Interview dates for 2017: January 4, 6, 9, 13. Applicants meet individually with three interview teams of two or three training faculty for 25 minutes each. Each team's questions focus primarily on a general area of psychological practice: (1) assessment, (2) therapy and direct intervention/consultation, and (3) general knowledge; there will also be an opportunity to describe the professional culture within the department. Group pictures for recall purposes only may be taken with the permission of applicants. Notification for APPIC Phase I occurs on Friday, February 17, 2017 according to APPIC procedures.

All matched candidates prior to employment must submit to fingerprinting and provide personal descriptive information in order to obtain criminal history record information for the purpose of screening individuals who accept employment with VBCPS. Checks are made with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Virginia State Police, and the Virginia Department of Social Services, Child Protective Services. Full school district policy, including when employment will be denied for failing the criminal background check, can be found at School Board Policies 4-56 for Licensed Personnel.

All doctoral interns sign a special services contract with Human Resources, receive an annual stipend of $23,660 plus health benefits, and are assigned to Psychological Services. Additionally, they are provided office space and clerical support equivalent to other full-time professional staff. This includes computer (desktop and/or laptop), internet and intranet access, personal assessment kits (WISC-V, WIAT-III, BASC-3, VMI, Vineland 2), and access to a library of assessment instruments, counseling materials, and computer scoring software. VBCPS is committed to equal opportunity employment and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, marital status, veteran status, and genetic information or any other basis protected by applicable federal, state or local law or regulation except where such categories are bona fide occupational qualifications. Full district Equal Opportunity Employment policy can be found at School Board Policies 4-4.

[TOP]

Program Faculty

Directors of Internship Training

Scott M. Bell, Psy.D., Director of Internship Training; Primary Supervisor; Licensed Clinical Psychologist; Pupil Personnel Services License (School Psychologist), Psy.D., Forest Institute of Professional Psychology, 2002. Professional interests: treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents; children from separation and divorce; sexual abuse treatment, risk of violence assessment; clinical supervision; professional development and licensure; program development. Professional affiliations: American Psychological Association; National Register of Health Service Psychologists.

Deborah M. Edwards, Psy.D., Assistant Director of Internship Training; Primary Supervisor Licensed Clinical Psychologist; Psy.D., Widener University, 2000. Professional Interests: clinical supervision, learning differences, psycho-educational assessment, instructional and behavioral classroom interventions, childhood treatment of behavioral and emotional disorders (i.e., depression, anxiety disorders, and ADHD).

Training Faculty:

Primary Supervisors

Suzanne E. Farley, Ph.D., Primary Supervisor; Licensed Clinical Psychologist; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 2006. Professional interests: Assessment and treatment of children with ADHD and behavioral and emotional disorders; classroom consultation; parent training.

Ellen M. Kveton, Psy.D., Primary Supervisor; Licensed Clinical Psychologist; Psy.D., Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology, 1989. Professional interests: clinical supervision; school-based therapeutic educational program for students with emotional disabilities; individual psychotherapy and play therapy with children; psychological and clinical assessments of children.

Mark G. Wehrlin, Psy.D., Primary Supervisor; Licensed Clinical Psychologist; Psy.D., Virginia Consortium Program for Professional Psychology, 1992. Professional interests: ADHD, play therapy, community consultation and program development, assessment (cognitive, personality, achievement), child and adolescent therapy, sexual abuse, supervision.

Stacie A. Wilson, Psy.D., Primary Supervisor; Licensed Clinical Psychologist; Psy.D., Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology, 2009. Professional Interests: clinical supervision, structured therapeutic educational program for students with emotional disabilities, adolescent and adult issues, HIV/AIDS, military families, gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender/questioning issues.

Site Supervisors

Beth T. Clingenpeel, Ed.D., NCSP, Preschool Site Supervisor; Licensed School Psychologist-Limited; Ed.D., University of Virginia, 2001. Professional Interests: preschool assessment, ecological approach to prevention, assessment, and intervention; social-emotional development; parent-child attachment; developmental literacy; response-to-intervention; early childhood classroom ecology. Professional affiliations: National Association of School Psychologists, Virginia Academy of School Psychologists.

Lisa Conway-Sugden, Psy.D., Training Instructor; Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Psy.D. Florida Institute of Technology, 2001. Professional interests: Child & Adolescent Treatment Series; Play Therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Interventions, Sand Tray, Sexual Abuse and Trauma Treatment, Supervision, Child and Adolescent Populations.

Heather O. Duke, Ed.S., NCSP, Preschool Site Supervisor; Licensed School Psychologist – Limited; Ed.S., The University of Alabama, 2010. Professional Interests: early childhood development and assessment, play assessment, autism spectrum disorders, response to intervention. Professional Affiliations: National Association of School Psychologists.

Kelli R. Good, Ph.D., Preschool Site Supervisor; Licensed School Psychologist-Limited, M.A., 1995, Ph.D. 2001, University of South Carolina. Professional interests: preschool assessment; parent training; group, individual and family therapy; emotional and behavioral disorders; ecological approach to prevention, assessment, and intervention; conflict resolution. Professional affiliations: National Association of School Psychologists.

Karen M. Jackson, M.S., CAGS, NCSP, Preschool Site Supervisor; Licensed School Psychologist-Limited. M.S., Southern Connecticut State University, 1988. Professional interests: preschool assessment, parent training and intervention, alternative service delivery, multicultural diversity issues. Professional affiliations: National Association of School Psychologists.

Jessica L. Keefe, Ed.S., NCSP, Autism Site Supervisor; Licensed School Psychologist-Limited; Ed.S., Radford University, 2005. Professional Interests: autism spectrum disorders, functional behavior assessment, working with military families.

Jennifer G. Ward, Ed.S., NCSP, Autism Site Supervisor; Licensed School Psychologist-Limited. Ed.S., Lehigh University, 2000. Professional Interests: assessment and intervention for students with autism spectrum disorders, response-to-intervention, positive behavior supports.

[TOP]

Current and Previous Doctoral Interns

The following is a list of current and previous doctoral interns by year of attendance, name, institution, and program:

2016-2017

Sally Galanti – North Carolina State University – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Rachel German – Ball State University – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Jennifer Mills – James Madison University – Psy.D. in Clinical and School Psychology (General Track)

Kelsie Offenwanger – Adler University – Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track)

Toni Prester – Adler University – Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track)

Virginia Ramos Matias – University of Utah – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

2015-2016

Brooke DeWitt – University of Massachusetts-Amherst – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Trevor Essique – Adler University – Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track)

Megan Maloy – Indiana University-Bloomington – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Megan McVea – University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill – Ph.D. in School Psychology (Neuropsychology Track)

Jessica Pliego – Texas A&M University-College Station – Ph.D. in School Psychology (Neuropsychology Track)

Karisma Turner – Howard University – Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track)

2014-2015

Kara Branz – Oklahoma State University-Stillwater- Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Laura Marques – Tulane University – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Julia Michael – University of Arizona – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Margaret (“Meg”) Tobias – Loyola University Maryland – Psy.D. – Clinical Psychology (General Track)

Jessica Vaughan-Jensen – Texas A&M University-College Station – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Christina Walker – Indiana State University – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

2013-2014

Lauren Baird – Pacific University – Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (Neuropsychology Track)

Gregory Callan – University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Jennifer Maldarelli –Tulane University – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Laura Miller – Syracuse University – Ph.D. in School Psychology (Neuropsychology Track)

Arlene Ortiz – Pennsylvania State University – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Jodi Yarnell – Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine – Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track)

2012-2013

Kate Altman – Chestnut Hill College – Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track)

Chandra Carter – University of Georgia – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Courtney Glueck – University of Georgia – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Summer Lane – University of Texas at Austin – Ph.D. in School Psychology (Neuropsychology Track)

Deborah Potvin – University of Texas at Austin – Ph.D. in School Psychology (Neuropsychology Track)

Erin VanOss – University of Wisconsin-Madison – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

2011-2012

Emma Cole – University of Texas at Austin – Ph.D. in School Psychology (Neuropsychology Track)

Shannon Cray – Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology – Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track)

Morgan Hall – Arizona State University – Ph.D. in School Psychology (Neuropsychology Track)

Freda Halls – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Priscilla Khuanghlawn - Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology – Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track)

Sally Moore – University of Florida – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Vivina Rivera – Texas A&M University – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Stephanie Robertson – Florida State University – Ph.D. in Combined Program in Counseling Psychology and School Psychology (General Track)

2010-2011

Amanda Ables – Indiana University – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Jessica Blasik – Duquesne University – Ph.D. in School Psychology (Neuropsychology Track)

Allison Graham – Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology – Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track)

Lisa Pass – Ball State University – Ph.D. in School Psychology (Neuropsychology Track)

Cixin Wang – University of Nebraska-Lincoln – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

2009-2010

Susan Antaramian – University of South Carolina – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Andrea Burch – Alfred University – Psy.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Kirsten Ellingsen – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill – Ph.D. in School Psychology (Neuropsychology Track)

Kathleen (Kasey) Fones-Wolf – Loyola College in Maryland – Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track)

Andy Pham – Michigan State University – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

2008-2009

Sheronda Farrow – Howard University – Ph.D. in Clinical Child Psychology (General Track)

Mary “Kristina” Groce – North Carolina State University – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Mary Skokut – University of California, Santa Barbara – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

Amanda Slonaker – Ball State University –Ph.D. in School Psychology and Neuropsychology (Neuropsychology Track)

Stephen Smith – University of Texas at Austin – Ph.D. in School Psychology (Neuropsychology Track)

Stacie Wilson – Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology – Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track)

2007-2008

Autumn Califano – Nova Southeastern University – Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track: Autism focus)

Ann Creilson – Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology – Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track: Gifted and Therapy focus)

Kyongboon Kwon – University of Georgia – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track: Research focus)

Naomi Perlman – George Mason University – Ph.D. In Clinical Psychology (General Track: Gifted focus)

Nathan Roehrig – Indiana State University – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track: Gifted focus)

Regilda Anne Romero – Pacific Graduate School of Psychology – Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology (Pediatric Neuropsychology Track)

2006-2007

Taya Branton – University of South Carolina – Ph.D. in Clinical-Community Psychology (General Track: Deaf Education focus)

Anna Crane – Ohio University – Ph.D. in Clinical Child Psychology (General Track: Gifted and Alternative Education focus)

Linda Nugent – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill – Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track: Neuropsychology focus)

Jennifer Rickert – University at Albany, State University of New York – Psy.D. in School Psychology (General Track: Gifted and Alternative Education focus)

Samuel Sweet – DePaul University – Ph.D. in Clinical Child Psychology (Neuropsychology Track)

2005-2006

Suzanne Farley - University of North Carolina-Greensboro - Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track: Gifted Educationfocus)

Charlotte Jones - Texas A&M University - Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track: Alternative Education focus)

Alexandra Kutz - University of Texas-Austin - Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track: Neuropsychology, Gifted Education, Alternative Education)

Emily Strassner - University of Texas-Austin - Ph.D. in School Psychology (Neuropsychology Track: Gifted Education)

Crista Wetherington - University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill - Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track: Neuropsychology, Gifted Education)

2004-2005

Tamara Baldwin - The Chicago School of Professional Psychology - Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track, Alternative Education focus)

Anabela DaSilva Smith - University of Rhode Island - Ph.D. in School Psychology (Pediatric Neuropsychology Track)

Gina Jackson - University of Florida - Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track, Gifted Education focus)

William Lindstrom - University of Georgia - Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track, Neuropsychology focus)

Michelle McElligott - Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology - Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track, Gifted Education focus)

Jason Nelson - Indiana University - Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track, Gifted Education focus)

2003-2004

Gwendolyn Gerner - Loyola College in Maryland - Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track, Neuropsychology focus)

Tyra Ripley - Arizona School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University / Phoenix - Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (Gifted Track)

Natalie Slider - Louisiana State University - Ph.D. in School Psychology (Gifted Track)

Kevin Smythe - James Madison University - Psy.D. in Combined Psychology (Clinical, Counseling, and School - Child & Family) (General Track)

Gabrielle Thompson - Loyola College in Maryland - Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track, Neuropsychology focus)

Monica Wolfe - Texas A&M University - Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track, Neuropsychology focus)

2002-2003

Lisa M. Gerrard - University of North Carolina at Greensboro - Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track)

David P. Gureasko-Moore - Lehigh University - Ph.D. in School Psychology (Gifted Track)

Sammi P. Gureasko-Moore - Lehigh University - Ph.D. in School Psychology (Public Health Track)

Michelle A. Jagodzinski - Indiana State University - Ph.D. in School Psychology (Gifted Track)

Elizabeth A. Stief - Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology - Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track, Neuropsychology focus)

2001-2002

Scott Bell - Forest Institute of Professional Psychology - Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track)

Emma Jurrens - Indiana State University - Ph.D. in School Psychology (Gifted Track)

Tara McKee - University of Connecticut - Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track)

Timothy Sterzik - Illinois School of Professional Psychology -Chicago Campus - Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (Gifted Track)

Kelli England Will - Virginia Polytechnic and State University - Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology (Public Health Track)

2000-2001

Kurt Metz - University of Kentucky - Ph.D. in School Psychology (Gifted Track)

Cassandra Newsom - Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology - Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (General Track, Neuropsychology focus)

Jon Thompson - University of Indianapolis - Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology - Child/Adolescent Specialty (Gifted Track, Neuropsychology focus)

Matt Turner - University of Kentucky - Ph.D. in School Psychology (General Track)

1999-2000

Andrea Arcona - Virginia Commonwealth University - Ph.D. in Child Clinical Psychology

Kevin Kelly - Lehigh University - Ph.D. in School Psychology

1998-1999

Cindy Finn - Magill University- Ph.D. in School Psychology

Susan League - University of South Carolina - Ph.D. in School Psychology

1997-1998

Yvonne Jacobs - University of Nebraska-Lincoln - Ph.D. in School Psychology

1996-1997

Soni Bansilal - University of Alabama - Ph.D. in School Psychology

Kelli Good - University of South Carolina - Ph.D. in School Psychology

Christi Hutto - University of South Carolina - Ph.D. in School Psychology

1995-1996

Carol Matheson - Pennsylvania State University - Ph.D. in School Psychology

Allison Morgan - University of Georgia - Ph.D. in School Psychology

1994-1995

Diane Foley - University of Maryland - Ph.D. in School Psychology

Ann Weaver - University of Kansas - Ph.D. in School Psychology

[TOP]

Further Questions

Contact Psychological Services at 757.263.2700 (phone) or 757.263.2702 (fax).

Or contact Dr. Scott Bell at scott.bell@vbschools.com


Last Modified on Friday, January 20, 2017