Kindergarten

Kindergarten is an exciting time of new beginnings and of learning new things every day. Our kindergarten program integrates the teaching of language arts (i.e., oral language, reading, and writing), mathematics, science, social studies and health through a language-rich curriculum.

 

 

English Language Arts

Your child will be introduced to a wide variety of reading materials that will help develop his reading, writing, and oral communication skills.

 

Goals

By the end of kindergarten, your child should be able to do the following (but is not limited to):

  • Recognize and identify their own first and last names
  • Name and write all upper and lowercase letters of the alphabet
  • Segment words into individual syllables
  • Identify words according to beginning and/or ending sounds
  • Identify a word that rhymes with a spoken word
  • Develop vocabulary by listening to a variety of reading materials (texts) read aloud
  • Use titles and pictures to identify the topic of the book and to make predictions about what will happen in the book
  • Make connections before, during and after reading (e.g., how the reading selection relates to other text that may have been read, the student’s personal experiences, or things that happened or are happening in the real world)
  • Identify text features specific to the topic, such as titles, headings and pictures
  • Identify simple facts and information relevant to the topic in a nonfiction reading selection
  • Identify what an author does (writes the book) and what an illustrator does (provides pictures or illustrations for the story)
  • Participate in group and partner discussions about various texts and topics
  • Retell familiar stories, using information from the beginning, middle and end of the story in the correct order
  • Discuss characters, setting and important events from a story
  • Ask how and why questions
  • Read common sight words (words that students recognize immediately)
  • Recognize a selection of high-frequency words (words that are seen most often in print) and sight words as well as read fifteen meaningful concrete words (words referring to things that you can see and touch)
  • Read and demonstrate understanding of grade-level appropriate reading materials
  • Know how to combine letters and make spoken as well as written words
  • Compose narrative writing (stories) and expository writing (facts)

*Tips

  • Read Every Day - Perhaps the single most important thing you can do at this stage to develop good reading habits and foster your child’s reading and writing skills is to read to and with her every single day. Read often with your child, even if just for 20 minutes a day, and include both fiction and nonfiction. Make reading time a fun experience that both of you enjoy.
  • Play Word Games - Play simple word games like “I Spy With My Little Eye,” seeking out things that begin with a certain letter. In the car, play games with road signs or license plates, such as having your kindergartener spot words or plates that begin with a specific letter.
  • Encourage and Explore Different Uses for Writing - Make sure that you and your child write in different ways for different tasks, purposes, and audiences. Examples of writing may include grocery lists, recipes, notes, thank you cards, letters, and stories. Authentic writing experiences will motivate children to write and foster a love of reading and writing.

Tips provided courtesy of NBC News Education Nation

Math

Your child will develop a sense of what numbers mean, how they can be used, and how to represent them in written form. Your child will also begin to recognize and identify repeating patterns, shapes, money, as well as tell time.

 

Goals

By the end of kindergarten, your child should be able to do the following (but is not limited to):

  • Count and recognize numbers to 100
  • Count objects in a set and match to a corresponding number
  • Count to 100 starting at any number by ones (1, 2, 3, 4…) and count by tens starting at zero (0,10, 20, 30, 40…)
  • Solve practical problems involving two equal sharers
  • Solve story and picture problems with sums and differences using concrete objects
  • Recognize and extend simple repeating patterns
  • Identify and describe plane figures (examples: 2-D flat figures like triangles, squares, circles)
  • Read and interpret a calendar
  • Describe, name and explain the relative positions of objects in space like above, below, in front, and behind
  • Start to recognize all coins and be able to count pennies and tell how many are equivalent to a nickel, dime, and quarter

*Tips

  • Incorporate Basic Math Concepts - Try to incorporate basic math concepts into everyday activities. Have your child count objects regularly and pose easy counting challenges, such as counting the number of steps on a flight of stairs or the number of red cars you see while driving. Take opportunities to count by tens, for example, if you've bought many of the same item at the grocery store or need to count a pile of coins. Talk to your child about how grouping them to count makes it easier.
  • Practice Shape Recognition - Practice recognition of different shapes. Have your child spot things that are triangular, like the roof of a house, or rectangular, like money. As you talk about different shapes, have him describe why a shape he spots is a triangle (three sides) or a square (four equal sides) or a rectangle (two opposite equal sides and two other opposite equal sides of longer length).
  • Apply Math in Everyday Life - It's especially memorable to children when they can use their new math concepts in their everyday life. Have your child arrange her favorite stuffed animals in a circle for a party and give two or three crackers to each toy. Have her add up the total number of crackers distributed. Ask her to predict how many more crackers she would need if one of her stuffed animals joined the party. Then ask her to predict the total number of crackers needed with yet another guest. This gives her an opportunity to "add up" in her head and then see if she is correct when she actually adds the next figure and counts up the new total. The game can be played in reverse when one of the figures leaves the party, taking its crackers with it.
  • Play Family Games with Math - Plenty of family games incorporate math. Connect Four, and dominoes are just some of the many games that help build math skills. Any game using dice and counting spaces also builds math concepts.

Tips provided courtesy of NBC News Education Nation

Science

Your child will begin to develop her science process skills (e.g., observing, measuring, classifying, inferring, predicting, experimenting, and communicating). Your child will use her five senses to explore the world around her through active discovery. Topics that your child will study include the following: magnets, natural resources (e.g., water, energy), plants and animals, and patterns in nature.

Social Studies

Students learn social studies concepts that build a foundation for learning independently and cooperatively with others. The focus in kindergarten social studies is developing a concept of self. Areas addressed include civics, economics, geography, and history.